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  • Larry G. Brown

MO-TELL Memories: Larry Brown

I grew up listening to stories, especially those of my grandfather and mother, and early in my childhood enjoyed listening to radio programs. I always appreciated hearing teachers, preachers, and other leaders use stories. Then in 1980 I heard my first “professional” storyteller at a conference, and believed I could do that, and began to integrate storytelling into my music performances. In 1981-82 I attended some storytelling festivals and workshops and was soon “on the stage.”


I tell folk tales, Ozark Jack Tales, personal memories, historical narratives, current issues, and have developed the specialties of chicken stories, tall tales, and spooky stories. I do Biblical Storytelling (Academy of Biblical Storytelling Certificate) as well.


My current goals in storytelling are to get my 200+ original stories preserved in written and/or recorded form; and to continue to be available for storytelling gigs for a variety of primarily adult audiences.


There are many experiences that have been very positive and memorable, so it is difficult to describe just one, but to observe the behavior of people in the audience that reveals the story has welcomed them into its narrative is so rewarding, whether that audience was a group of 6 or 600, or the ages from 4 to 99.


I have been honored to share the stage with some of the best known and best loved tellers. I joined MO-TELL at least 30 years ago. I was MO- TELL president around 2014-2017. It was a time when we had 7- 8 active storytelling groups/guilds in the state, and 5-6 annual storytelling festivals. It was good to be in communication with so many tellers and storytelling organizations, and to collaborate in the fostering of storytelling.


MO-TELL, along with other organizations have consistently helped me with skill development, find new venues, and strengthen collegiality. Friendships found here have endured over the years. I want people to know that while I enjoy telling to all ages and stages, my preference is adults; and that I thoroughly enjoy helping people experience humor, wonder, awe, inspiration, and motivation to be one with all people and the earth. I advise new tellers to tell what they most appreciate, do not be afraid of challenges in learning a story, focus on the narrative plot, and always foster interaction with the listeners.


A story is a process of connecting and the mutual influence of the teller, the story, and the listeners.


Contact Larry G. Brown at 10 Hourigan Circle, Columbia, MO 65201; brownstory@hotmail.com; or 573-256-0091.

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